Near the end of Chapter 5 of Lord of the Flies by William Golding, the author employs all of the following techniques to express the boys' (Simon, Piggy, Ralph) troubled feelings EXCEPT: a....

Near the end of Chapter 5 of Lord of the Flies by William Golding, the author employs all of the following techniques to express the boys' (Simon, Piggy, Ralph) troubled feelings EXCEPT:

a. Repetitive diction

b. Ellipses

c. Dashes

d. Elaborate syntax

e. Interrogative

Asked on by Erika015

2 Answers | Add Yours

literaturenerd's profile pic

literaturenerd | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

Elaborate diction is not found in the closing of chapter five (William Golding's Lord of the Flies). Elaborate (meaning detailed and complicated) diction (choice and use of words) refers to very detailed and complicated words. The following is an example of elaborate diction: "uncomprehending silence that followed it the one crude expressive syllable" (earlier in chapter five). While chapter five does contain elaborate diction, it does not appear at the end of the chapter where repetitive diction, dashes, ellipses, and interrogatives are found together. 

Toward the end of the chapter, the boys speak repeatedly about the rules (repetitive diction). The dashes are used in two different ways: a pause ("If there is ghosts-") and changing of the subject ("If he could do what he wanted- you're all right."). The ellipses are used to signal a pause in dialogue ("If only they could send us something grown-up...a sign or something."). Interrogatives, or questions, are found in numerous places in the closing of chapter five. They are used to signal real questions ("Why couldn't you say there wasn't a beast?") and rhetorical questions ("Oh, what's the use?). 

Sources:
amarang9's profile pic

amarang9 | College Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

Midway through Chapter 5, Ralph uses repetitive diction to emphasize some of his points. In stressing the importance of the fire, he repeats the significance of the fire and even uses an interrogative statement to get the others to think about what he is saying: 

"The fire is the most important thing on the island. How can we ever be rescued except by luck, if we don't keep a fire going? Is a fire too much for us to make?" 

He flung out his arm. 

"Look at us! How many are we? And yet we can't keep a fire going to make smoke. Don't you understand? Can't you see we ought to--ought to die before we let the fire out?" 

Dashes are used to emphasize a series of points in this section when Piggy voices his concerns. He also uses the interrogative/questioning technique to get the others to think about/answer his concerns: 

“What are we? Humans? Or animals? Or savages? What’s grown-ups going to think? Going off—hunting pigs—letting fires out—and now!” 

Ellipses are used in this chapter as well. In particular, near the end of Chapter 5, ellipses, dashes, interrogative techniques, and repetitive diction are all used. Repetitive questions (interrogative) are used such as in this series about their frustration with the false fear of the beast:

“But s’pose they don’t make sense? Not here, on this island? Supposing things are watching us and waiting?” 

The three of them use dashes (Piggy, Simon, Ralph), Ralph uses an ellipses, and repetition is used when they each "wish" for something: a father, an auntie, or a grown-up. Elaborate syntax is not really used in this context because the boys are trying to make their points simply and clearly. 

Sources:

We’ve answered 318,982 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question