Near the end of chapter 11 of Lord of the Flies, while there is a great deal of imagery used, of what nature is the dominant imagery of the passage? a. Visual b. Olfactory c. Gustatory d....

Near the end of chapter 11 of Lord of the Flies, while there is a great deal of imagery used, of what nature is the dominant imagery of the passage?

a. Visual

b. Olfactory

c. Gustatory

d. Tactile

e. Auditory

Asked on by Erika015

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mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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e. Auditory

Among the choices, the two dominant types of imagery are visual and auditory; however, there are more auditory images than visual near the end of Chapter Eleven of Lord of the Flies, and they are certainly shattering and unnerving images, as well.

With the death of Simon and the stealing of Piggy's glasses, all vestiges of civilization have been destroyed by Jack's band of savages. Hoping to appeal to the remnants of civility in Jack, Piggy grabs the conch with the determination to appeal to Jack to restore some order on the island. Surprisingly, when Piggy and others approach, the savages grow silent. However, they soon begin booing; then, when he calls them "a pack of painted Indians" in contrast to the "sensible" Ralph, the cacophony of savagery recommences:

The booing rose...
Again the clamor..."Zup!"
Ralph shouted against the noise.
... bristled with spears.
The storm of sound beat at them, an incantation of hatred.
The rock bounded
...the sea breathed...in a long, slow sigh, the water boiled...
This time the silence was complete...
...Jack [was]...screaming
... his spear... tore the skin
... the tribe screaming now
A great noise as of sea gulls rose...
...[Ralph] was crashing through foliage....
...the tribe returned noisily...
The yelling ceased, and Samneric lay looking up in quiet terror.

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