The Narative of the life of Freddick Douglas/slaveryAccording to Frederick Douglass, what is slavery like? What does slavery do to the slaves? To the slaveholders?

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litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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Douglas's autobiography is very eye-opening. Despite his time as a slave, he is eloquent and persuasive. He is convincing because despite his origins he is still able to describe slavery the way that most white people of the time would have expected other white people to.
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brettd | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

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Douglass does a masterful job of revealing what slavery is like in one particular section of Narrative, and that is when he is sent to the slavebreaker.  Slavebreakers were people who were too poor to own their own slaves, and relied on others to lend them to him.  The only way they would was if it was a rebellious slave who needed to be "broken".

If ever I was made to drink the bitterest dregs of slavery, it was my year with Mr. Covey.

Douglass speaks of his intellect languishing, his desire to read extinguished, he fully and readily admits to being broken.  Imagine what it would take to break a soul such as his.

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jbiersach | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Adjunct Educator

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A close look at what Douglas himself had to say about slavery in the Upper South suggests that it was, for him, demeaning in a manner much less physical and much more intellectual than one might, at first, imagine.  The "Narrative..." Douglas wrote includes surprisingly varied judgements of the various masters for whom he was forced to work.  He disliked some and he hated others.  In all cases, his "Narrative..." provides intelligent, informed, and rational explanations for his judgements.  Most of all, Douglas hated being treated as somebody less than human.  He refused to submit to a system that did not allow him to be the man he knew he could become. Thus, for Douglas, slavery was intolerable to the point that he took the risk of fighting back.  With remarkable bravery, he stood his ground when insulted and when threatened with violence.  For Douglas, there was no better way to resist slavery than to escape it -- which he did.

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srg4886 | Student, Grade 9 | eNotes Newbie

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A close look at what Douglas himself had to say about slavery in the Upper South suggests that it was, for him, demeaning in a manner much less physical and much more intellectual than one might, at first, imagine.  The "Narrative..." Douglas wrote includes surprisingly varied judgements of the various masters for whom he was forced to work.  He disliked some and he hated others.  In all cases, his "Narrative..." provides intelligent, informed, and rational explanations for his judgements.  Most of all, Douglas hated being treated as somebody less than human.  He refused to submit to a system that did not allow him to be the man he knew he could become. Thus, for Douglas, slavery was intolerable to the point that he took the risk of fighting back.  With remarkable bravery, he stood his ground when insulted and when threatened with violence.  For Douglas, there was no better way to resist slavery than to escape it -- which he did.

  can you answer this same question but according to George Fitzhugh in the writings of The Blessings of Slavery 1857?

According to Fitzhugh, what is slavery like? What does it do the slaves? What does it do to the slaveholder?

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