Name a literary device in Macbeth act 3, scene 1. Quote the line(s) it appears in, and explain how the literary device is used. 

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The first portion of act 3, scene 1 shows Banquo engaged in a soliloquy, a speech a character delivers when they are alone on stage:

Thou hast it now,—king, Cawdor, Glamis, all.
As the weird women promised; and, I fear,
Thou play'dst most foully for't: yet it was said
It should not stand in thy posterity;
But that myself should be the root and father
Of many kings. If there come truth from them,—
As upon me, Macbeth, their speeches shine,—
Why, by the verities on thee made good,
May they not be my oracles as well,
And set me up in hope? But, hush; no more.

A soliloquy tends to show a character's...

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tcburton | Student

In Act 3, Scene 1 of Macbeth Shakespeare utilizes soliloquies to further quickly further the plot and showcase the secret thoughts of Banquo.

Soliloquy is a literary device commonly used by playwrights in order to provide a quick context for a character’s changing motivations and actions. Unlike monologues, soliloquies allow characters to secretly express their new or developing thoughts and emotions about other characters and situations to themselves.

In Act 3, Scene 1 Banquo’s soliloquy highlights his growing distrust of Macbeth as he considers the implications of the witch’s prophecies:

“Thous hast it now: King, Cawdor, Glamis, all/ As the weird women promised, and I fear/ Thou play’ds most foully for’t. Yet it was said/ It should not stand in they prosperity,/ But that myself should be the root and father/ Of many kings.”

Here Banquo seriously begins to question the actions and motives of Macbeth to himself. This soliloquy is what causes Banquo to decide to flee Macbeth, his former friend, in fear of the foul reactions Macbeth may take against him.

ksoll525 | Student

Shakespeare used symbolism in lines 62-63 in Act 3 Scene 1 ofMacbeth. 

" Upon my head they placed a fruitless crown,/ and put a barren sceptre in my grip."

The fruitless crown and barren sceptre symbolize Macbeth's impotency and add to the prediction that he will not have son succeed him as king. 

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