Is it my right to have my ovaries removed without the doctor's permission?Is it my right to have my ovaries removed without the doctor's permission?

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litteacher8's profile pic

litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

The doctor has to remove them.  You can't remove them on your own.  You can find another doctor, if your doctor has chosen not to.  You can always get a second opinion.  You may need to pay for it yourself though, if you go against your own doctor.

amy-lepore's profile pic

amy-lepore | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

You have the right to do what you think is best for you and your body, but depending on your age and your family history, removing your ovaries may not be in your best interest.  Ovaries have many jobs--hormones and eggs aren't the whole story.  Be sure you have researched and done your homework thoroughly before going through with this procedure.  It's a little like a haircut--once it's gone, you can't put it back.  In the case of organs, sometimes the procedure can be reversed, but it is almost never easy to do...especially if your ovaries aren't viable anymore.

Don't make a mistake you'll regret!

linda-allen's profile pic

linda-allen | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Senior Educator

Posted on

I read an article about a woman who wanted the same procedure and she was refused it. Her circumstances was that she was 21, she had already had two children and a number of terminations. She was using birth control and still got pregnant.

The main problem is that being so young, they didn't seem to think that she knew what she wanted. It would be awful if 10 years later you changed your mind and there was no going back from such an extreme measure.

But reproduction is not the only function of the ovaries. They also produce hormones that are vital to a woman's health and well-being. Removing them at a young age would put the woman into premature menopause, which would put her at risk for other diseases.

pippin1313's profile pic

pippin1313 | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Adjunct Educator

Posted on

I read an article about a woman who wanted the same procedure and she was refused it. Her circumstances was that she was 21, she had already had two children and a number of terminations. She was using birth control and still got pregnant.

The main problem is that being so young, they didn't seem to think that she knew what she wanted. It would be awful if 10 years later you changed your mind and there was no going back from such an extreme measure.

timbrady's profile pic

timbrady | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

Posted on

 

I think we all, men and women, have the right to make decisions about our own body, but I think we have a responsibility to ourselves and others to make INFORMED decisions.  If I am making a bad decision about my body, eg. about what to put into it such as drugs, cigarettes, etc), then I'm not sure about that right (J. S. Mills and others notwithstanding).  As long as there is someone else in the world that counts on me, then I think I have some resonsibility to myself and that person.  You can probably find a doctor who, for the right amount of money, will perform almost any procedure, but that's an economic, not a moral decision.  It would be interesting to know in what the moral framework the question was asked....

 

rshaffer's profile pic

rshaffer | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Assistant Educator

Posted on

A woman has the right to decide what is best for her body.  Although I understand a doctor's reservations because this is a serious decision that affects so many elements of womanhood, I still believe that  a woman has the right to make decisions about her own body.  I would only hope that before such a final procedure, that there is an extremely good reason, one decided upon with much thought and counseling.

linda-allen's profile pic

linda-allen | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Senior Educator

Posted on

If the doctor won't give "permission," then who's going to take out your ovaries?

I can understand why a doctor is refusing to perform this procedure on you. Regardless of how many release forms you sign absolving the doctor of any responsibility should you later decide you made a mistake, you could easily win a malpractice lawsuit against him or her. If later on you decide that this doctor tricked you and deprived you of having a baby, you would certainly find a court somehow that would rule for you. A jury might consider that you were under mental duress or for some reason not thinking clearly when you signed the release forms.

Why have a body part removed if there is no reason to do so? Are you afraid that you might develop cancer? Would you have your skin removed if you had tanned in sun every day as a teenager and might develop skin cancer? Would you remove a lung because you've been exposed to secondhand smoke?

Besides that, a doctor is sworn to heal and repair, not to damage a body that needs no repairs.

parkerlee's profile pic

parkerlee | Teacher | (Level 2) Educator

Posted on

It's a free country - you should be able to find a doctor who will give you a complete hysterectomy simply because you want it, but you really should think twice before you do it. What are your reasons? If it's a sterilization you want, you should just have your fallopian tubes severed or tied. Ovaries do more than simply produce eggs; they also produce hormones which keep your body "in balance" and stave off premature ageing.

I suggest you check out the following sites and consult more than one doctor before making such a decision.

There is also an online help group where you may find the information and contacts you need:

http://www.hystersisters.com/

cullenlvernwat's profile pic

cullenlvernwat | Student, Grade 9 | (Level 1) eNoter

Posted on

umm eww no. first of all why would you want your ovaries removed...dont you want kids? and second of all, doctors no best so you shouldnt do something without a doctor's permission.

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