My question has to do with antibodies and antigens, and if it is a D.N.A. process when the antibodies destroy the antigens.A person will produce specific chlamydia antibodies in the blood, in...

My question has to do with antibodies and antigens, and if it is a D.N.A. process when the antibodies destroy the antigens.

A person will produce specific chlamydia antibodies in the blood, in response to invading chlamydia antigens. The imune system will destroy the antigens. During this destruction process the immune system will take some of the genetic material from the chlamydia antigen and it will develope and replicate specfic chlamydia antibodies those chlamydia antibodies will specifically detect, identify and destroy the invading chlamydia antigens in the blood.

My question is;

Would the above be considered a D.N.A. process?

Thank for any and all help you can give me.

 

 

Asked on by jilguz

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bandmanjoe's profile pic

bandmanjoe | Middle School Teacher | (Level 2) Senior Educator

Posted on

Well, yes and no.  Yes, in the respect that a person's DNA holds the magic blueprint to the entire person, the inner workings of everything in that person's body, of which the immune system would be a part of.  That's kind of "big picture" thinking, it dictates what the immune system is and what it does, it's ability to organize body defenses against invading pathogenic cells, such as Chlamydia.

No, in the respect that it is a specific response orchestrated by the immune system of that person.  This is "small picture" thinking, meaning the department responsible for combating invading enemy cells is the one called directly.  It's ability to mass produce Chlamydia antibodies is dictated by the DNA, but is done directly through the operation and response of the immune system itself.

It's kind of like this:  if someone is breaking into your house, who would you call, the mayor's office, or the police department?  You would call the police, of course, because they will directly intervene with the offending burglar.  Even though the mayor's office hires, influences, and pays the police department's officers, they do so in a strictly "supervisory" capacity.  The official "police work" is left to the police department itself.

Sources:

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