In The Pigman, how does Lorraine's reason for writing about the Pigman differ from John's?

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The Pigman is written from the first person perspective; however, the novel throws a bit of a twist on the narrative voice. Readers get two first person perspectives. John is our narrator for certain chapters, and Lorraine is our narrator for the other chapters, so we get a really cool change in perspective throughout the book. A good example of this changing perspective can be seen in the reason that John gives for writing about the Pigman versus what Lorraine tells us. John will tell us in chapter 1 that he suggested they write about the Pigman because he could not stand the depressed funk that Lorraine had been in since the Pigman died.

I was a little annoyed at first since I was the one who suggested writing this thing because I couldn’t stand the miserable look on Lorraine’s face ever since the Pigman died. She looked a little bit like a Saint Bernard that just lost its keg, but since she agreed to work on this, she’s gotten a little livelier and more opinionated.

John's reason for writing the book is to help Lorraine out. Lorraine's reason for writing the book is to preserve the memory of the Pigman and everything that has happened to them in the previous months.

It’s just that some very strange things have happened to us during the last few months, and we feel we should write them down while they’re fresh in our minds. It’s got to be written now before John and I mature and repress the whole thing.

Lorraine feels that the story needs to be written down, so the key details will not be forgotten. Her motivation is akin to making sure that things are written down for an accurate historical record. John simply wants to make Lorraine feel better.

While both John and Lorraine have different stated reasons for writing this story down, readers will see in chapter 3 that both John and Lorraine feel that the writing process is an effective tool to help them cope with their actions and the loss of a close friend.

Her eyes come to life the second we talk about it. Her wanting to be a writer is part of it, I guess, but I think we’re both a little anxious to get all that happened in place and try to understand why we did the crazy things we did.

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In Chapter 1, John says that he suggested they write about the Pigman for Lorraine's sake, because he "couldn't stand the miserable look on Lorraine's face ever since the Pigman died".  He thinks that writing about it would be a kind of catharsis for her, and he notes that since they agreed to work on it, she's gotten a little livelier.

In Chapter 2, Lorraine says, "...some very strange things have happened to us during the last few months, and...we should write them down while they're fresh in our minds...it's got to be written now before John and I mature and repress the whole thing".

I think in the final analysis, John and Lorraine's real reasons for writing about the Pigman are actually much the same.  John sums it up in Chapter 3 - "I think we're both a little anxious to get all that happened in place and try to understand why we did the crazy things we did".

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