mutations can you name a mutation that adds new gross anatomy....aka organs or parts of organs, eyes, ears...anything really.  duplications and rearrangements of existing body parts do not count. The theory of evolution says animals desscended from a bacteria-like common ancestor via selected mutations....therefore, I'm looking for the addition of new, novel, anatomical features via mutation. thank you

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I think a good example of this is tails.  Theoretically, animals developed tails from stubs.  Animals with longer stubs might have been more effective and would live longer, so they would mate with other animals with long stubs and eventually they would all have long stubs.

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I agree that evolution works gradually.  You wouldn't see a sudden change.  There would be a gradual change over thousands of years.  The end result compared with the beginning could seem startling, but humans didn't evolve from micro organisms over night.  Evolution would suggest that these changes happened gradually. 

It may interest you to work in the other direct as well.  Humans now have many organs that are superfluous.  For example, I am living perfectly well without a gallbladder.  Once upon a time, our ancestors needed this organ to survive.  A caveman might not be able to find food for several days.  When he did find a meal, it was likely he would gorge and eat as much of it as he could.  The gallbladder supplied the digestive fortitude to be able to process large quantities of food and store it until the next meal.  Now, most people eat at least three regular meals a day.  There is little need for certain digestive chemicals to be held back or released in large quantities. 

This is true of other organs as well.  Think about the appendix or the tonsils.  We needed them at one point in time but now they really don't serve much purpose.

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If I understand you correctly, you're asking for something like an eye popping up by itself out of nowhere.  That's not how evolution works.  It works by rearrangements and small, incremental additions.  That's why it took billions of years to get from the single-cell stuff up to more complex kinds of life.

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