Mrs. Merriweather and Mrs. Farrow talk about good Christians. Scout talks and feels bad for Jews, but not black people in Maycomb. Compare?Mrs. Merriweather and Mrs. Farrow talk about good...

Mrs. Merriweather and Mrs. Farrow talk about good Christians. Scout talks and feels bad for Jews, but not black people in Maycomb. Compare?

Mrs. Merriweather and Mrs. Farrow talk about good Christians. Scout talks and feels bad for Jews, but not black people in Maycomb. Compare?

Asked on by mangos

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mjush's profile pic

mjush | College Teacher | (Level 2) Adjunct Educator

Posted on

I think what you are asking here is comparing why does scout feel bad for the Jews and not for the black people in the county? Obviously, both attitudes demonstrate predjudice and racism. However, initially Scout does not see the difference between how the Jews are treated and how the blacks are treated. This is pivotal because it shows how people do not always see what they are doing or feeling is racism. By the end of the story though, she does see that the way blacks are treated is wrong and the situation even brings her to tears. Much of this book is seeing people as people rather than as a religion, as a race or even as a town rumor.

gbeatty's profile pic

gbeatty | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

Compare their attitudes? They are related, but not completely parallel. By that I mean, they are related in that both Germans and Americans accept their own attitudes as right, and even as natural. Both are racist. They are different in that the German attitudes towards the Jews undergo a sudden eruption, and turn bad as the rest of the world is trying to raise its standard of mutual humanity. The ongoing shift in attitudes towards African Americans is part of this. Scout does feel bad about how they are treated, especially after going through the trial and what happens to Tom. She sees it is not fair.

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