The movie The Fly and the Bride of Frankenstein - How is science depicted/presented? What are the implications of science? exploring the themes that the movies both share

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In both films, the primary conception of science is almost akin to a force of nature with which a sense of reverence and respect must be evident.  In both films, the scientists in question fail to understand the natural limitations of science.  They immerse themselves in the pursuit of their own ends, which might be more ego than actually scientific.  This blurring of both motivations helps to set the stage for disaster in both films, elements that were not foreseen with terrible results as the consequences.  The idea that scientific advancement should be divorced from egoistic aims is a theme that emerges from both films.

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These movies depict science in both negative and positive ways and explore the possibility of horrible things happening if it goes awry.

In a positive way both movies try to portray science as an opportunity to explore the unexplored. The goals were to make scientific advancements that could be used for good. In the movie The Fly it was used more as a scientific way but in the movie Bride of Frankenstein it was for personal reasons. Sometimes scientists do not look at the negative outcomes that can be caused by their experiments.

Unfortunately, both movies ended up having terrible outcomes. Science was not necessarily used to better the scientific community but certain details were overlooked and both movies had horrible outcomes.

 

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