I need to find a movie that connects in a smart way to any kind of French author (Hugo, Chateaubriand, Honoré de Balzac, Flaubert, Baudelaire, Zola, Saint-Exupéry, Sartre, or Camus) and another...

I need to find a movie that connects in a smart way to any kind of French author (Hugo, Chateaubriand, Honoré de Balzac, Flaubert, Baudelaire, Zola, Saint-Exupéry, Sartre, or Camus) and another movie that connects to a Spanish author (between Bécquer, Rosalía de Castro, Valera, Galdós, Machado, Baroja, Miguel de Unamuno, García Lorca, or García Marquez). For example, speaking about English I made a link between Orwell and The Matrix.

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Ashley Kannan | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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One of the most distinctive aspects of Gabriel Garcia Marquez is his affinity for mythic construction.  Magical realism plays a vital role in his works.  I think that one modern movie that can connect with Garcia Marquez's works would be Guillermo del Toro's Pan's Labyrinth.  One way in which the film can connect with Garcia Marquez is in the magical realism element.  There is a connection between the way in which Marquez utilizes fable, myth, and a challenge to realism in order to illuminate political, social, and psychological truths.  This element is a part of the film, where Ofelia's experiences mirror much of what might very well be featured in a Garcia Marquez work.  The convergence between mythic development and political reality is another element that can bind the film to the author.  The narrative of Princess Moanna parallels the rise of Franco's authoritarian repression in Spain.  In being able to create universal conditions out of specific political situations, the film is similar to the style of Garcia Marquez.

In terms of Jean-Paul Sartre, the overwhelming premise in his existentialist frame of reference is that human beings are all alone.  Sartre's existentialism is a statement about the human predicament in the modern setting.  This philosophical idea is present in Tarantino's Reservoir Dogs.  In this film, bank robbers are assembled for "one big score."  While they might start off believing in one another and their central purpose, after mistakes are made, they are left with the hollow understanding that "hell is other people."  The final scene in which the robbers have either abandoned one another or turned guns on those who remain is existentialist in scope.  It connects to Sartrean ideas that human beings are alone and that "existence precedes essence."  The film is a reminder that the forlorn condition intrinsic to existentialism can create powerful levels of drama on film.

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