The Most Dangerous Game Questions and Answers
by Richard Edward Connell

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In "The Most Dangerous Game," critics say "ironically, Zaroff's belief in his invincibility as a hunter weakens him and causes his defeat." Cite evidence from the story to either support or challenge this statement.

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During Zaroff's first meal with Rainsford, he demonstrates confidence in his hunting abilities by explaining to Rainsford that hunting has "ceased to be what you call 'a sporting proposition'" (Connell, 7). Zaroff proceeds to tell Rainsford that his success as a hunter is a "mathematical certainty," and he always gets his quarry. Zaroff boasts that "There is no greater bore than perfection," and animals have literally no chance of ever competing with his ability to reason, which is why he was motivated to hunt humans. Zaroff's comments emphasize his personal belief in his own invincibility as he proceeds to challenge Rainsford in the hunt.

During the hunt, Zaroff once again demonstrates his overconfidence by allowing Rainsford to live after the first day of the competition. Zaroff successfully follows Rainsford's trail through the forest at night but decides to walk away after discovering Rainsford in a tree the following morning. Zaroff's decision to allow Rainsford to live underscores...

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