Count of Monte Cristo frequently employs disguise. What are some of the other persons he adopts, and how do these guises help him achieve his ends? The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas

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In his efforts to be the Providential paraclete, Edmund Dantes assumes a number of disguises, the most prominent of which is that of the Count of Monte Cristo.  Here are his other disguises:

  • Sinbad the Sailor - this epiphet is used after Dantes watches the Morrels and comes to realize that...

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In his efforts to be the Providential paraclete, Edmund Dantes assumes a number of disguises, the most prominent of which is that of the Count of Monte Cristo.  Here are his other disguises:

  • Sinbad the Sailor - this epiphet is used after Dantes watches the Morrels and comes to realize that the family is in a desperate family crisis.  For the daughter's betrothal he leaves a precious jewel in a little purse.  Through Sinbad, Dantes pays for the ships.
  • The Englishman, Lord Wilford - He is an agent of Thomson and French, the concern that has the papers on the boats of Monsieur Morrel, and he calls on Morrel, telling him that he will receive a message from Sinbad the Sailor.
  • The Abbe Busoni - When he finds the inn that Caderousse runs, Dantes disguises himself as a priest, the Abbe Busoni, who has a large diamond, persuades Caderousse with this jewel to reveal all that has happened to Edmund Dantes.
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