Is Montag and Mildred's marriage in "Fahrenheit 451" a typical marriage in their culture? Please explain.

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gmuss25 eNotes educator| Certified Educator

Montag and Mildred's marriage is typical in Bradbury's dystopian society in that they both do not genuinely care about each other or live fulfilling, healthy lives. Montag and his wife behave more like disgruntled roommates than they do husband and wife. Mildred is interested only in watching her interactive television shows on her three parlour walls, while her husband is searching for meaning in life. She takes copious amounts of sleeping pills to numb her mind and seeks solace in driving at high speeds throughout the country at night. She is entirely disinterested in her husband's search to find himself and discover the meaning of his life.

When Montag turns off the parlour walls and forces Mildred to read, she quickly gives up and protests the fact that he owns books. She even calls the firefighters on Montag, knowing that they will destroy everything she owns and arrest her husband. Montag cares about his wife yet understands that their relationship is empty. He cannot even recall where they met for the first time and cannot truly say he loves her. Overall, Montag and Mildred's relationship is typical in Bradbury's dystopian society, where citizens are callous, shallow, and superficial.

clane eNotes educator| Certified Educator

Yes. There is very little emotion in this society, there is no expression or means of expression and no longer any free thinking. Every thought and feeling is interrupted with the constant din of the TV walls that encompass the house which emit meaningless dribble that makes almost no sense. Since there is little opportunity to think and express, marriages are more like cohabiting than they are deep meaningful relationships. No one really has any relationship with anyone, it's a society in which everyone lives side by side but they are all alone, they nothing to connect them like literature.