The Mississippi Flood of 1927When considering the Mississippi flood asgeography and the development/diffusion of human society (great numbers of African Americans migrated to north after the...

The Mississippi Flood of 1927

When considering the Mississippi flood asgeography and the development/diffusion of human society (great numbers of African Americans migrated to north after the flood due to the dire situations and teatment after, and during, the flood and due to the already unfavorable conditions they faced previous to the flood), how does this help us to contextualizesignificant events, people and intellectual developments and help us to identify the similarities among events separated by significant chronological, cultural, and geographic distance?  

Asked on by kerrierg

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brettd's profile pic

brettd | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

Your question is both complex and a little convoluted, so it's difficult to give you a direct answer to all of those pieces.  Let me try to add a few comments that will hopefully be useful to you.

Flooding in a state as poor and as segregated as Mississippi was in the 1920s would involve tragedy and misfortune for both white and black sharecroppers and tenant farmers.  The 1927 flood, more so than most, marked a permanent tragedy that drove some residents permanently from the affected flood plain and even the state.

There's also important symbolism in the history: a flood of water that created a flood of misery that led to a flood of migrants.  Hard to to ignore that as a powerful context.

litteacher8's profile pic

litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

Your question is a little jumbled. Are you comparing the flood to other historical events that were similar? I would argue that flooding is always related to socioeconomic, geographical and political issues. There are many reasons people live in a floodplain, but they often do so because it's cheaper. I am reminded of the recent floods, where the decision was made to flood the Bayou to save the more affluent areas, destroying the poor when there is little chance of saving the rich.

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