In A Midsummer Night's Dream, is Helena's speech in which she says "Love looks not with the eyes but with the mind" in blank verse?This is for an audition, I need a piece from A Midsummer Night's...

In A Midsummer Night's Dream, is Helena's speech in which she says "Love looks not with the eyes but with the mind" in blank verse?

This is for an audition, I need a piece from A Midsummer Night's Dream in blank verse.

Expert Answers
bullgatortail eNotes educator| Certified Educator

Although this a beautiful soliloquy from William Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream, I'm afraid you'd better search for another piece for your audition. The lovesick Helena's speech concerning the power of love is not in blank verse, but in rhyming verse. The definition of blank verse is a type of non-rhyming verse with a definite meter, usually in iambic pentameter. Helena's soliloquy rhymes throughout, as does most of the longer speeches in A Midsummer Night's Dream. You might consider Titania's speech in Act II, Scene 1 when she converses with Oberon. It is in blank verse. Good luck with your audition.

lit24 | Student

Helena's soliloquy occurs at the end  of Act I Sc.1 of "A Midsummer Night's Dream." Helena is in love with Demetrius but Demetrius wants to marry Hermia who in turn is in love with Lysander. Helena feels sad that she is not able to attract Demetrius like her friend Hermia and comments on the strange ways of romantic love. She concludes that

Love looks not with the eyes, but with the mind;
And therefore is wing'd Cupid painted blind:

meaning that even though she is as attractive as her friend Hermia, it is Demetrius' mind and not his eyes which decides who to fall in love with.

This soliloquy is not in Blank Verse. Unrhymed iambic pentameter is referred to as Blank Verse. Since this soliloquy is in ryming couplets it is not Blank Verse.

Read the study guide:
A Midsummer Night's Dream

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