In Kafka's Metamorphosis how does Gregor's relationship change between his family, or does it stay the same?

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After his transformation into a large insect, Gregor's family is horrified and disgusted by him. Eventually, they decide that he must be "gotten rid of," and no longer see him as capable of human thoughts or emotions. While remembering his family with love, Gregor quietly dies.

Gregor's father treats him...

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After his transformation into a large insect, Gregor's family is horrified and disgusted by him. Eventually, they decide that he must be "gotten rid of," and no longer see him as capable of human thoughts or emotions. While remembering his family with love, Gregor quietly dies.

Gregor's father treats him coldly and strikes out at his son after discovering his metamorphosis. Later, the father throws fruit and causes Gregor serious injury. Gregor's father shows him little sympathy both as a human and an insect.

Gregor's mother feels sorry for her "unlucky son," and desires to see him after his transformation. However, she faints from the shock. Later, she attempts to protect Gregor from her husband. She remains largely helpless and passive toward Gregor throughout the novella.

Gregor is very fond of his younger sister, Grete. She is the most sympathetic to his plight and takes responsibility for his care by bringing him food and cleaning up after him despite her obvious revulsion. Later, she grows to resent her duty toward Gregor. She is the one who changes the most toward Gregor, insisting at the novella's end that the family must be rid of him for good.

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