Mending Wall Symbolism

What are the symbols that Frost presents in "Mending Wall"?



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The speaker tells us that his neighbor on the other side of the wall has a grove of pine trees while his own property contains an apple orchard. Pine trees are, of course, coniferous, and they do not shed their needles in the fall but keep them all year round. Apple trees are deciduous, and they shed their leaves in the fall, growing apple blossoms in the spring and then apples in the summer and early fall. Pine trees seem so serious and dour compared to the joyful burst of flowers put forth by apple trees, as though they are quite prim compared to the apple trees that grow flowers, then fruit, the lose their leaves, then do it all again. When the narrator says that "Spring is the mischief in [him]" a few lines later, it makes it seem as though the apple trees symbolize him, while the pine trees symbolize his neighbor. He doesn't like the wall, as he says, multiple times, "Something there is that doesn't love a wall, / That wants it down." The apple trees lead a rather messy life...

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