What is the meaning of Poem IV in Rabindranath Tagore's "Gitanjali?"

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The speaker is a highly devoted person who just wants to please God. He is prepared to do so by singing songs for Him. The poet thinks his life is “useless” and “without a purpose.”

In thy world I have no work to do;

It “can only break out in...

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The speaker is a highly devoted person who just wants to please God. He is prepared to do so by singing songs for Him. The poet thinks his life is “useless” and “without a purpose.”

In thy world I have no work to do;

It “can only break out in tunes,” if God “commands” him to serve Him through his songs. This implies that his life can find its true purpose only if his songs could please God.

“The dark temple of midnight” may refer to the dark hour of his life. He expresses his desire to sing Him hymns during the time of hardship and suffering.

The poet knows it very well that remembering God at the time of pain and agony is much easier than worshipping Him during the moments of success and happiness. So, he requests God for “commanding my presence” to sing for him “in the morning air.” "The morning air" suggests the joyful hour of life. 

We see the speaker wants every moment of his life to be dedicated in praising and pleasing God. He doesn't want anything to prevent him doing so, neither the pains nor the joys.

The poet seems to have realized the futility of life if it's devoid of devotion to God and spiritual longing. The “useless life” can find its purpose only in the service of God.

Being a poet and lyricist, Tagore wishes to make his life meaningful and fulfilling by rendering his songs in the service of the Almighty.

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