If "Me Talk Pretty One Day" is satire, what does it satirize?

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In the beginning of “Me Talk Pretty One Day,” in his characteristic flippant, humorous tone, David Sedaris seems to set out to satirize the advantages of returning to school at middle-age. He facetiously enumerates, for instance, the benefits of his recently issued student ID: “a discounted entry fee at movie theaters, puppet shows, and Festyland, a far-flung amusement park that advertises with billboards picturing a cartoon stegosaurus sitting in a canoe and eating what appears to be a ham sandwich.”

As Sedaris begins to write about his first day as a student learning French in Paris, his self-deprecating tone is refocused towards the challenging process of learning a new language. Sedaris describes how he and his classmates struggle to answer a question from their aggressive, seemingly sadistic teacher about their likes and dislikes, clearly depicting the experience of being forced to suddenly inhabit unfamiliar territory—a world in which one feels out of place, uncomfortable,...

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