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To show that sin 15 = (6^1/2 - 2^1/2)/4, let's start with the values of the functions of a number that is well known, sin 30 = 1/2 and cos 30 = (sqrt 3)/2

sin 15 can be written as sqrt [(1 - cos 30)/2]

sin 15 = sqrt [(1...

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To show that sin 15 = (6^1/2 - 2^1/2)/4, let's start with the values of the functions of a number that is well known, sin 30 = 1/2 and cos 30 = (sqrt 3)/2

sin 15 can be written as sqrt [(1 - cos 30)/2]

sin 15 = sqrt [(1 - (sqrt 3)/2)/2]

=> sin 15 = sqrt [(1/2 - (sqrt 3)/4)]

(sqrt 6 - sqrt 2)/4 is not equal to sqrt [(1/2 - (sqrt 3)/4)]

This shows that the value of sin 15 is not equal to (6^1/2 - 2^1/2)/4, instead it can be equated to sqrt [(1/2 - (sqrt 3)/4)]

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