In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, is the claim by Victor Frankenstein that there cannot be any 'community' and kinship between him and his creation true?I would like to dicuss this using the quotes...

In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, is the claim by Victor Frankenstein that there cannot be any 'community' and kinship between him and his creation true?

I would like to dicuss this using the quotes "I am the creature; I ought to be thy Adam" and "Begone! I will not hear you. There can be no community between you and me; we are enemies. Begone, or let us try our strength in a fight, in which one must fall."

Asked on by bernie101

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accessteacher | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

These quotes come from Chapter Ten and are of course vital in terms of analysing the relationship between Victor and his creature that he brought so willingly into the world, only to reject him as soon as his creation was complete. Your question asks for an opinion, and so I will give you mine.

Personally, I don't agree with Victor's claims that there can be no "community" between himself and the creature. This seems to me to be very extreme. This is something that the creature himself tries to reason against. In his quote that you have cited above, he establishes a parallel between God and his creation of Adam and Victor and his creation of himself. God made Adam to be in relationship with him, and so the analogy would lead us to suggest that Victor could have a relationship with his creation in the same way. However, Victor ignores this, showing the limitations of the analogy. Whilst God is essentially good and righteous, Victor definitely is not, and therefore cannot be expected to prize love over hatred in every case. What is important to realise is that Victor, from the moment that he had given his creation the spark of life, rejected it and spurned it. His natural instincts were repulsion. I personally think that he had a responsibility as a maker to care for his creation, whatever his feelings, and that those instincts of repulsion could have been overcome had he but given it time. However, this novel is the story of how the human is actually more monstrous than the monster he creates.

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