Martin Luther King, Jr. describes life one hundred years after the signing the Emancipation Proclamation in his "I Have a Dream" speech. What specific examples does he state about life one hundred years later in the second paragraph?

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In the second paragraph of the "I Have a Dream" speech, King mentions the following aspects of black life, a century after the slaves were freed through the Emancipation Proclamation: he says, first, that black people still suffer from segregation and discrimination. He notes, second, that black people exist on...

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In the second paragraph of the "I Have a Dream" speech, King mentions the following aspects of black life, a century after the slaves were freed through the Emancipation Proclamation: he says, first, that black people still suffer from segregation and discrimination. He notes, second, that black people exist on what he calls an "island" of poverty amid widespread white prosperity. He also mentions that black people are marginalized or, as he puts it, shoved into the corners of society. Alluding to the Bible and the state of the ancient Israelites in Egypt, King finally calls black folks "exiles" in their own land.

In a nutshell, King explains that legal freedom has not brought equality or prosperity to the black population. They are poor, marginalized, and discriminated against. He will go on later in the speech to say that black people were given a promissory note (a note one gets when taking out a loan, promising to pay it back) from whites one hundred years ago, stipulating that they would eventually be paid what they were due in terms of equality and enjoying the same rights as whites. However, that note is overdue, and black folks are still waiting for payment, as the examples in paragraph 2 illustrate.

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Martin Luther King, Jr. gave his famous "I Have a Dream" speech in front of the Lincoln Memorial during the March on Washington on August 28, 1963. The crowd consisted of about 250,000 people and 3,000 members of the press. Interestingly, the "I have a dream" sequence of the speech was not part of King's written notes. He improvised it on the spur of the moment from a theme he had developed in previous speeches after the renowned gospel singer Mahalia Jackson shouted out to him, "Tell 'em about the dream, Martin, tell 'em about the dream."

In paragraph two of his speech, King compares the contemporary situation with the situation 100 years previously when President Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation. Although he says that Lincoln's proclamation was "a great beacon light of hope," his comparison points out obvious deficiencies in life for African Americans a century later.

Martin Luther King, Jr. often used repetition in his speeches for emphasis, and he does this in the second paragraph of the "I Have a Dream" speech. This makes it easy to find the specific examples he uses because he prefaces each example with the phrase "one hundred years later." Go through the paragraph looking for each instance of this phrase, and you will find the specific examples you need to answer your question. King first states that "100 years later the Negro still is not free." He also states that 100 years later African Americans still suffer from segregation and discrimination, live in poverty while surrounded by prosperity, are relegated to the corners of society, and are exiles in their own country.

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Martin Luther King, Jr. gave his famous "I Have a Dream" speech on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial one hundred years after the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation by President Abraham Lincoln. At the beginning of his speech, Martin Luther King, Jr. brings up the fact that he is speaking one hundred years after the signing of the proclamation, and he describes how life is for African Americans one hundred years later. The examples show that life is not better for African Americans.

Martin Luther King, Jr. says that African Americans are still not free in America. African Americans are still held down by segregation and discrimination in America. African Americans live in poverty while everyone else in the country prospers. African Americans are pushed to the outside of society and it feels like African Americans are exiled in their own lands. 

Below is the paragraph you are referring to:

But one hundred years later, the Negro still is not free. One hundred years later, the life of the Negro is still sadly crippled by the manacles of segregation and the chains of discrimination. One hundred years later, the Negro lives on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity. One hundred years later, the Negro is still languishing in the corners of American society and finds himself an exile in his own land. So we have come here today to dramatize a shameful condition.

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