marriage and wealthhow is marriage and wealth related in jane austen's time?  

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tinicraw | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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Wealth and security is certainly a big part of of Jane Austen's times. When I think of Libya, I think of Islam and women dressed in veils to cover their faces. This made me think of dress codes during Austen's times, too. Dresses were long, then for the same reasons that Muslim women wear them today--for modesty. In both cultures, women were supposed to be the epitome of virginity and purity. Showing too much skin was considered too over-sexualized. I had a professor once say that a woman's hair indicated how strict she was to observe social and feminine rules of the day. Wearing one's hair too loosely also suggested that the woman was loose. So looking at dress codes between the two time periods might be another way to approach a section of your research paper. 

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wannam | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

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While I cannot tell you how Jane Austen relates to the Libyan culture, I can share a little about how marriage and wealth related during this era.  In Jane Austen's novels, we see the story from the viewpoint of a woman.  Women were not usually allowed to have a job during this time.  It was thought that a woman should be accomplished in some way such as art or music and she should run the household.  There were a few jobs a woman could do such as becoming a governess or a servant, but these jobs were looked down on and taken only by the desperate.  A woman was supported by her family and then by her husband. A woman would need to marry in order to secure her place in society and provide for herself.  Men held the wealth.  Occasionally, there would be a wealthy woman but this only occurred when the woman was either a widow or the last remaining member of a wealthy family.  Wealth and property was passed from man to man and not to a woman.  A widow would only retain possession of a property if there were no male family memebers to claim it.  Male members of the family were expected to care for and look after any unmarried females, but this was often considered a burden.  

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amirananis | Elementary School Teacher | (Level 1) eNoter

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In reply to #4: thank you for your post it was very helpful, and the reason why i choose this was it was similar to each other even after 3 centuries the same concept is the same and no revolution will help this situation.
amirananis's profile pic

amirananis | Elementary School Teacher | (Level 1) eNoter

Posted on

While I cannot tell you how Jane Austen relates to the Libyan culture, I can share a little about how marriage and wealth related during this era.  In Jane Austen's novels, we see the story from the viewpoint of a woman.  Women were not usually allowed to have a job during this time.  It was thought that a woman should be accomplished in some way such as art or music and she should run the household.  There were a few jobs a woman could do such as becoming a governess or a servant, but these jobs were looked down on and taken only by the desperate.  A woman was supported by her family and then by her husband. A woman would need to marry in order to secure her place in society and provide for herself.  Men held the wealth.  Occasionally, there would be a wealthy woman but this only occurred when the woman was either a widow or the last remaining member of a wealthy family.  Wealth and property was passed from man to man and not to a woman.  A widow would only retain possession of a property if there were no male family memebers to claim it.  Male members of the family were expected to care for and look after any unmarried females, but this was often considered a burden.  

thank you for your post , but the reason why that it is similar is because of the same concept of marriage that we find in jane austen is the same with the libyan cultre no reveluotion  will help.

amirananis's profile pic

amirananis | Elementary School Teacher | (Level 1) eNoter

Posted on

In reply to #4: thank you for your post it was very helpful, and the reason why i choose this was it was similar to each other even after 3 centuries the same concept is the same and no revolution will help this situation.
amirananis's profile pic

amirananis | Elementary School Teacher | (Level 1) eNoter

Posted on

I am writing my reasarch project about jane austen's novels reflected to the libyan culture, and i want to know how are they are similare.

 

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