Many critics have commented that the ‘creature’ is ultimately one with whom we can sympathise. Explore Mary Shelley’s presentation of the ‘creature’ in light of this viewHow could you...

Many critics have commented that the ‘creature’ is ultimately one with whom we can sympathise. Explore Mary Shelley’s presentation of the ‘creature’ in light of this view

How could you explore the creature in this particular view?

Asked on by sorcharose

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mwestwood's profile pic

mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

The desire to be loved is absolutely intrinsic in all thinking creatures.  After the creature discovers the DeLacey family, he vicariously shares in their loving relationships. In this way, his hunger for love is nurtured, but not satisfied.  For, he wants to experience friendship first hand; when he enters the cottage with the blind father, the creature does momentarily feel the warmth of friendship from the old man.  However, because the children are frightened and repulsed by his physical appearance, the creature is rejected and chased from the cottage. 

This rejection cannot but remind many of Shelley's readers of some incident in their lives in which they, too, were spurned and not included in celebrations, etc.  Of course, readers will sympathize with the creature who has been treated so cruelly after he has performed so many acts of kindness for the DeLaceys.

pohnpei397's profile pic

pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

Think about aspects of the creature's life that make you feel sorry for it and identify with it.  For me, that would include most of all the feelings that the creature would have experienced when he was rejected by the people of the village.  He had really come to like them and yet they rejected him.  They rejected him not because of his behavior or anything but simply because of how he acted.  I think that, by having these things happen to him, Shelley is trying to get us to sympathize with the monster.

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