Major injustices of 'To Kill a Mockingbird'I have to write an assignment about 3 major injustices in the novel 'To Kill a Mockingbird' and I can't decide which examples to use.  Any ideas on some...

Major injustices of 'To Kill a Mockingbird'

I have to write an assignment about 3 major injustices in the novel 'To Kill a Mockingbird' and I can't decide which examples to use.  Any ideas on some big ones that will have lots of supporting evidence and quotes in the book? thanks :)

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e-martin's profile pic

e-martin | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

Another more figurative injustice - and perhaps the greatest crime in the novel - is Bob Ewell's attack on Jem and Scout. 

This is not an injustice of the court system, it is a moral injustice when Ewell attacks the children of the man who was only doing his job and telling the truth in court. Instead of attacking Finch himself, Ewell attacks his children, who are young and had nothing to do with the trial.

litteacher8's profile pic

litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

The two major injustices are the treatment of Boo Radley and the accusing and convicting of Tom Robinson.  Both were gentle, kind men who did not deserve what happened to them.  The larger injustice is that people don't accept anyone who is different.

bullgatortail's profile pic

bullgatortail | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

Another major injustice was the way in which Boo was treated by his father. Arthur Jr. was apparently a normal, well-adjusted teenager when he was arrested, but his father's unusual punishment--to lock him away inside the Radley House with no contact with the outside word--turned Arthur into the "malevolent phantom" Boo, who only came out at night. Even following the deaths of Boo's parents, Boo remained a recluse within his own home, where his mental state must have continued to deteriorate as the years passed by. Sadly, Boo's heroic rescue of the children on Halloween night did not change his unusual life, since Scout "never saw him again" after that night.

shake99's profile pic

shake99 | Teacher | (Level 3) Senior Educator

Posted on

I'd agree with Post 2 that Tom's conviction is the greatest specific example of an injustice. But I think we'd also have to look at the pervasive racism in Maycomb as an injustice. The ingrained attitude of so many people makes it possible for hatred and prejudice to flourish in society. So, while Tom is obviously discriminated against, his fate is made possible by society's long held belief that one kind of person is superior to another kind of person.

etotheeyepi's profile pic

etotheeyepi | Student, Undergraduate | (Level 1) Valedictorian

Posted on

The most obvious could be Tom's conviction for rape even though the circumstanial evidence suggests his innocence.

The segregated nature of the culture seems unjust to me.  Black people are thought inferior.  Aunt Alexandra divides white society into important and unimportant people.  Even Scout thinks she's better than Walter Cunningham. 

To me the greatest injustice is the fact that Dill leaves town, and that destroys the budding romance between Dill and Scout.

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