Is Macbeth a brave man? What is the proof? if macbeth is a brave man, please help me to find some examples

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In the beginning of the play, Macbeth is a valiant soldier whose strength and skill virtually save the day on the battlefield.

After all the tragedy and lies and heinous acts that Macbeth becomes involved in, he finds himself in the very last scenes of the play discarding all the "baggage" of the prophecies and his ruinous ambition in order to put on his old armor and fight in armed combat against foes greater in number and mightier than those he commands, despite realizing that he has been essentially tricked and deceived. This may show that inside he still retains the soldierly qualities of bravery and personal honor that marked him at the start of the play, and that it is these things that make up his "real" character, those qualities that somehow got lost in his power-hungry. He dies a soldier's death, in battle, facing his enemy, instead of surrendering to humiliation.

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Overall assessment of Macbeth's character varies. Some view him as a tragic hero who held every potential for being a good man but was overcome by the evil forces in his world. Others argue that Macbeth completely lacked any moral integrity. Finally, he is viewed most harshly by some who see him as a Satanic figure, in that he knowingly chooses evil and unleashes it upon the world.

Macbeth commits a trio of heinous crimes in the course of the play: the killing of Duncan, the murder of his closest friend, Banquo (and attempted murder of Fleance), and the deliberate slaughter of innocents in the persons of Macduff's wife and child. Given all this, we may tend to forget that prior to his encounter with the weird sisters, Macbeth is a hero, a loyal warrior in service of the legitimate king of Scotland, Duncan.

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