"Macbeth," "Animal Farm," and "Of Mice and Men"What is the common link or thread among Macbeth, Animal Farm, and Of Mice and Men?Please include any relevant examples to prove the common link...

"Macbeth," "Animal Farm," and "Of Mice and Men"

What is the common link or thread among Macbeth, Animal Farm, and Of Mice and Men?Please include any relevant examples to prove the common link between all three texts, thanks heaps.

Asked on by tash-01

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litteacher8's profile pic

litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

All three stories involve tyranny of those in power over others.  In the case of Macbeth and Animal Farm, leadership is stolen from an unsuspecting populace and the leader is supposed to have their best interests at heart.  In Animal Farm, Napoleon wrenches power from Snowball and from the communist concept, and in Macbeth Macbeth kills Duncan in order to become king.  Of Mice and Men is the story of a different kind of tyranny—the effect on workers of an exploitative system.

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cybil's profile pic

cybil | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

Posted on

I think a common thread is man's inhumanity to man. In each of the three works you cite, cruelty in some form exists. In Macbeth, the power-hungry Macbeth resorts to murder to reach his goal of remaining king while in Animal Farm the pigs, also driven by power, discriminate against other, weaker animals and eventually against one of their own kind, Snowball. In Steinbeck's novel, most of the characters are victims of prejudice: Lennie is developmentally delayed, Crooks is a physically handicapped black man, Candy is an elderly man missing one hand, Curley's wife has no true identity or freedom on the ranch, and even George is a small person. These outcasts have trouble fitting into society because they are not accepted; others such as Curley are cruel to them. Two of the characters in Of Mice and Men die tragically; little hope exists for the others because of the inhumane nature of the society they live in.

In each of the works, some violence occurs; it is motivated in large part by inhumanity. Most readers agree, however, that George kills Lennie out of a desire to spare him a worse death at the hands of Curley; George is not cruel. He's guilty of mercy killing to save Lennie from further inhumane treatment.

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