I m given an asignment on "States of water in the environment".Can anyone here help me out by suggesting what am i actually supposed to write in it?I am a college student doing B.Sc(H) botany...

I m given an asignment on "States of water in the environment".Can anyone here help me out by suggesting what am i actually supposed to write in it?

I am a college student doing B.Sc(H) botany final year. And this is an ecology assignment.What are the possible references here?

Asked on by kmani

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pacorz | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

Posted on

I think your professor is trying to make you consider the fact that water is only taken up by plants when it is in the liquid state. Winter, accompanied by frozen ground, is sometimes referred to as a "physiologic desert", because although there may be adequate amounts of water present in the winter environment, if it is frozen, it is unavailable for plants to utilize.

This is the reason that evergreens growing in temperate climates demonstrate water-conserving adaptations. Keeping the leaves or needles through the winter is a very successful adaptation for growing in nutrient-poor soil, but the plant must not lose more water through evapotranspiration than it takes in or it will reach the permanent wilting point and die. As a result, evergreens tend to have thick waxy cuticles and sunken stomates that can close more tightly than other plants. Broadleaf evergreens like rhododendrons will curl their leaves in response to low temperatures and humidity, and some members of the group also have fuzzy leaf undersides to increase the leaf boundary layer, another way to slow water loss.

On the converse side, plants that live in alpine zones or certain tropical regions called "cloud forests" sometimes have to access water in the vapor form year-round; this is particularly true of epiphytes like orchids and bromeliads, which live perched on other plants. For these plants, adaptations may include hairs that collect moisture from water vapor in the air, leaf shapes that funnel collected water toward the base of the plant and the roots, and specialized air roots which can take in water vapor from the air directly.

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