In the Restoration play The Man of Mode by George Etherage, an orange appears and it seems like there's something hidden in the orange. Does it have any other hidden meanings? It feels like it's...

In the Restoration play The Man of Mode by George Etherage, an orange appears and it seems like there's something hidden in the orange.

Does it have any other hidden meanings?

It feels like it's more than just a fruit!

Asked on by tjswn1994

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appletrees | College Teacher | (Level 2) Educator

Posted on

In the period when this play was written (1676), oranges were not a common fruit for people to purchase. The play is set in London, and oranges do not grow naturally in this cold and damp climate. The closest place where oranges would be grown would most likely be Spain, and the origin of the fruits connotes a sensual image of a warm Mediterranean setting. Therefore the conversation that takes place during the act of buying oranges is colored by this detail: the woman selling the oranges is associated with sensuality and the conversation between the orange seller and Dorimant focuses on her news about a beautiful heiress who has recently arrived in town, and Dorimant's desire to have an affair with her.

Orange is also a color associated with sensuality and sociability. It is considered a color that encourages communication and is associated with extroverted personalities, such as the one Dorimant embodies.

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