Explain these lines from "Ode to Duty"...."I, loving freedom, and untried...Too blindly have reposed my trust."  "I, loving freedom, and untried; No sport of every random gust,Yet being to myself a guide,Too blindly have reposed my trust." 

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This quotation is taken from William Wordsworth 's "Ode to Duty". This poem was written later in Wordworth's life, after he had written many romantic poems touting the virtues of freedom and love. After the death of his brother, the long illness that stuck his sister and the death of...

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This quotation is taken from William Wordsworth's "Ode to Duty". This poem was written later in Wordworth's life, after he had written many romantic poems touting the virtues of freedom and love. After the death of his brother, the long illness that stuck his sister and the death of his daughter, youthful enthusiasm for the freedoms of nature and life were replaced with the idea of duty. He began to think of the supreme power as a moral code, not nature itself. These lines express the harsh realities that Woodsworth, as a mature man, had to face. He says, in essence, that he placed his trust "too blindly" in freedom and in his own youthful intuition. Instead, he adopted a kind of stoicism, which replaced his youthful enthusiasm with more self-control. This poem, among other,  represents a change in Wordsworth's earlier romantic ideals to a ideas that are controlled by a more mature mind. He is passing " into the final phase of his career."

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