In "The Lottery" by Shirley Jackson, what are some examples (3 at least please) of figurative language? (Figurative language being similes, metaphors, and personification.)

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Figurative language is the use of words to express something more than a literal meaning. Shirley Jackson uses figurative language at several points in "The Lottery" to enrich the narrative and illustrate her setting more vividly.

Simile

The eNotes Guide to Literary Terms defines a simile as

[A] figure of speech that makes a comparison of two unlike things with the help of comparative words such as like or as.

The phrases "fly like a bird" and "as red as a rose" are both similes.

As the other Educators have noted, there is only one simile in "The Lottery," which comes before the official lottery proceedings begin. Mrs. Hutchinson has been speaking to her friend and leaves her to go stand with her husband.

She tapped Mrs. Delacroix on the arm as a farewell and began to make her way through the crowd.

The tap on the arm stands in here for a more obvious form of farewell, like saying "goodbye." While in a literal sense, a tap on the arm is just a tap on the arm, in a figurative sense, Mrs. Hutchinson's gesture...

(The entire section contains 4 answers and 1187 words.)

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