In "Lord of the Flies," what is Jack's family history? If Jack was writing a letter who would he write it to? Also, what do you think he would miss most about England, and what changes should he...

In "Lord of the Flies," what is Jack's family history? If Jack was writing a letter who would he write it to? Also, what do you think he would miss most about England, and what changes should he be experiencing? 

Asked on by babieb5

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ms-mcgregor's profile pic

ms-mcgregor | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

Golding does not reveal Jack's family history. However, by looking at his personality, he has a real desire for control and power. This might suggest that he lacked such control or power at home or that his parents taught him to be in control. He never speaks about his father the way that Ralph does, so perhaps he does not miss him and was not close to him the way Ralph seems to have been close to his father. He seems to see his stay on the island as a chance to be a leader and be able to make decisions on his own. His leadership of the choir was probably controlled by the choir director and so now he is free of all constraints. Thus, he probably misses the physical comforts of home but he is experiencing the change of not having to answer to others.

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gmuss25 | College Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

As was mentioned in the previous response, William Golding does not elaborate on Jack's family history. Jack does not reference his parents or relatives like Ralph and Piggy, but one can surmise what his home life was like in England. Jack is an entitled individual who argues to be chief simply because he was the head of the choir. Jack is also aggressive and selfish. Jack's personality indicates that he was probably revered by his parents and brought up in a home where he essentially "ruled the roost." Jack's parents were probably not very strict and allowed him free reign to do whatever he wanted. Jack's tyrannical leadership style stems from the fact that he probably got his way all the time at home. If Jack was to write a letter, he would probably address it to one of his parents bragging about his hunting skills. He would probably not disclose his location or details about the island because he enjoys being the boys' savage leader. Jack gives no indication about missing his life back in England, but one could surmise that Jack possibly misses modern amenities. Jack begins to change into a more independent, skilled individual while on the island. He not only teaches himself how to hunt but becomes the boys' authoritarian leader by ingeniously manipulating them. 

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