In the ' Lord of the Flies' is Simon deluded and ill, or has he alone grasped the true nature of what is going on ?Consider the Lord of the Flies' words " I'm part of you.. Im the reason why it's...

In the ' Lord of the Flies' is Simon deluded and ill, or has he alone grasped the true nature of what is going on ?

Consider the Lord of the Flies' words " I'm part of you.. Im the reason why it's no go." Explain what you think in detail.

Asked on by js94

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susan3smith | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator

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In the novel, Simon faces the "pig's head on a stick"--the Lord of the Flies, and falls into a trance.  Simon is not hallucinating; he is having a vision.  The vision is his nsight about the beast.  The Lord of Flies tells Simon that Simon knew all along who the beast was.  It is "not something you can hunt and kill."  It is the savagery that lies within each of the boys.

The facts of the novel support this idea.  The boys' most dangerous enemy comes not from without but from within.  It is their carelessness, fear, power struggles, and aggression that cause the turmoil on the island.  Simon is being tempted here.  He can become savage as the others, and survive, or he can refuse and "they will do him."  Only Simon seems to understand the nature of evil on the island, just as he is the only one to ascertain the true nature of the beastie:  a dead man with a parachute. 

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shizuo | Student, Grade 11 | eNotes Newbie

Posted on

In another point of view, there is a constant reference to religious aspects within the novel. When considering the section of the clause: 'I'm part of you...' - it could be said that Simon is a religious icon, as Golding presents him constantly as omniscient, omnipotent and a trustworthy, benevolent character. As the 'head on a stick' is a representation of the Beelzebub, a figure of hatred and fear, this meeting ultimate shows how the fear and negativity of the world, the microcosm of society, is infecting benevolence and care. This is a crucial pivot within the novel, as in depth, this is the point where the turnout of hate and love combines as one, with only one outcome. The death of Simon in the following pages emphasises how this metaphorical battle was won by the pigs head, and it can only get worse.

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