In Lord of the Flies, how does Simon's hiding spot influence him when he goes there to meditate? How does he change after first discovering the hiding spot, and how does the setting influence him?...

In Lord of the Flies, how does Simon's hiding spot influence him when he goes there to meditate? How does he change after first discovering the hiding spot, and how does the setting influence him? Please explain the significance of this:

"Since they had not so far to go for light the creepers had woven a great mat hung at the side of an open space in the jungle; for here a patch of rock came close to the surface and would not allow more than little plants and ferns to grow. The whole space was walled with dark aromatic bushes, and was a bowl of heat and light. A great tree, fallen across a corner, leaned against the trees that still stood and a rapid climber flaunted red and yellow sprays right to the top.” (52)"

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garthman99 eNotes educator| Certified Educator

Simon's hiding place is first described near the end of Chapter 3 - Huts on the Beach. Simon had a penchant for being alone it seems. We are told that he held his breath and listened to the sounds of the island. He stayed there. He found the place in bright sunshine and stayed there until it was dark. The setting must have relaxed him as it was secluded and had "aromatic bushes”, scenic flowers and scented flowers that were strong to enough to permeate the entire island. This could have powerful effects on Simon's mental state. After discovering the hiding place he becomes cynical and we are told that he believes "everything is a bad business"

Later on, when Simon encounters the Lord of the Flies - which was a pig's head skewered on a stick - he imagines the pig head grinning at him but also becomes hypnotized and transfixed and imagines himself in the mouth of the pig. It is possible that he had been so tranquilized by his hideaway that he became more susceptible to delusion. He mentions a ”dead man on a hill" as he tries to escape the boys and it is possible that his self-imposed isolation and state of mind made it easier for the boys to kill him.

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Lord of the Flies

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