Lord of the Flies by William Golding

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In Lord of the Flies, how is the brutality within each individual often more dangerous than evil from an outside source? I really need help with this one. This is for a discussion, so examples and some...

In Lord of the Flies, how is the brutality within each individual often more dangerous than evil from an outside source?

I really need help with this one. This is for a discussion, so examples and some analysis would help. Thank you!

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In the final chapter, Ralph "argue[s] unconvincingly" with himself that the hunters will leave him alone or, perhaps,

make an outlaw of him.  But, then the fatal unreasoning knowledge came to him again. 

Too late, Ralph recognizes the evil that men do is innate, and is quite dangerous because it is so often not recognized.  For, if Ralph and Piggy were to recognize the innate sadism in Roger when he picks up the stone--"that token of preposterous...

(The entire section contains 231 words.)

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