In Lord of The Flies, what evidence is presented, in the beginning of the book, that shows Jack starts out being innocent? What evidence is presented, later in the book, that shows Jack gradually...

In Lord of The Flies, what evidence is presented, in the beginning of the book, that shows Jack starts out being innocent? What evidence is presented, later in the book, that shows Jack gradually losing innocence and becoming a savage?

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kapokkid eNotes educator| Certified Educator

While Jack is very eager to be a leader, and is rather ruthless about it with his choir, he is willing to accept Ralph as being the elected "chief," he even goes along with Ralph's orders for a little while. Jack's innocence is perhaps best demonstrated when he and Ralph encounter a piglet in the forest, but he is unable to kill it with his knife. He and Ralph share a laugh about it and then move on.

It is not until Jack begins to paint his face and take on other forms of savagery that he is able to kill a pig. His further descent into savagery is shown during the killing of Simon. 

After Simon's death, he has become the leader of a tribe that is based on violence and he has completely lost the civilized background he once had. Though Roger is perhaps the true sociopath in the group, Jack relishes his position, relishes the hunt, and relishes the opportunity to try and kill Ralph at the end of the book.

When the naval officer comes to rescue the boys, Ralph weeps bitterly at the complete loss of innocence he witnessed on the island.

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Lord of the Flies

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