Consider the following statements: Piggy says there is nothing to fear except other people. Simon says the beast exists inside each of the boys. Do these two comments have anything in common? Do...

Consider the following statements: Piggy says there is nothing to fear except other people. Simon says the beast exists inside each of the boys. Do these two comments have anything in common? Do Piggy and Simon's statements make sense?

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gmuss25 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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In Chapter 5, the boys discuss whether or not the beast actually exists. Piggy tells the boys that he doesn't believe that a beast exists on the island, and says that the only thing the boys possibly have to fear is other people. Simon attempts to explain that the beast is actually within each person. These two comments parallel each other because the belief that all humans have a savage instinct is the underlying reason the boys should fear other people. The violent instincts individuals possess can be contained by society's conventions. However, Golding suggests that individuals' animalistic nature reigns supreme in a world without laws and boundaries. Simon realizes that each person possesses this primitive instinct. Piggy understands that individuals are capable of savage acts and recognizes the violent potential in each person. I feel that both comments make sense because, without the restrictions society places on people, individuals would act according to their desires without second guessing their decisions. In a world without consequences, people are likely to harm others, which supports Piggy's comment. The driving force that allows people to harm others is the primitive instinct in all humans, which supports Simon's comment.

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