Looking at chapters 16-18 of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, is there any evidence that shows Twain's position on war?Many people say that those 3 chapters represent Twain's thoughts on war,...

Looking at chapters 16-18 of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, is there any evidence that shows Twain's position on war?

Many people say that those 3 chapters represent Twain's thoughts on war, but having read them several times, I am still not sure where he stands on the subject. Examples from the text would be appreciated.

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stolperia | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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As Huck, operating under the alias of George Jackson (spelled Gorge Jaxon, according to Buck) becomes acquainted with the history of his host family, the Grangerfords, and the long-standing feud with their sworn enemies, the Shepherdsons, Twain's feelings about the justifications of war become evident.

To start with, Huck can't quite understand the reason for the feud. As Buck explains the origins of the situation, Huck becomes steadily more confused by the lack of logical reasons for the argument.

A feud is this way. A man has a quarrel with another man, and kills him; then that other man's brother kills him; the the other brothers, on both sides, goes for one another; then the cousins chip in - and by-and-by everybody's killed off, and there ain't no more feud.

Huck never does arrive at any understanding of the reasons for the feud. He recognized the irony of the Grangerfords and the Shepherdsons attending the same church and remarking on the valuable message of the sermon, "all about brotherly love, and such-like tiresomeness" as they sat with their guns "between their knees or stood them handy against the wall."

In the same way, Twain never found any justification for the theory that killing one another solved any problems or made sense.

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