Look over meter 9, book 3 of The Consolation of Philosophy by Boethius and explain why Boethius's philosophy and views on creation are not Christian.

Boethius's philosophy and views on creation are not Christian because he doesn't explicitly draw upon Christianity in framing his arguments and his worldview is a mixture of pagan and Christian elements. In meter 9, book 3 of The Consolation of Philosophy, we see this when Boethius presents us with a picture of creation that owes much to Neoplatonism.

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Both Boethius and Lady Philosophy take the existence of God for granted. As such, they do not seek to engage in offering proofs. Instead, they discuss the nature of God, his power, how he brought the world into being, and so forth. As Boethius and his interlocutor are both philosophers,...

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Both Boethius and Lady Philosophy take the existence of God for granted. As such, they do not seek to engage in offering proofs. Instead, they discuss the nature of God, his power, how he brought the world into being, and so forth. As Boethius and his interlocutor are both philosophers, their conception of God is what Pascal would later describe, somewhat derisively, as the God of the philosophers, a conceptual construct which is of a qualitative difference to God as traditionally worshiped by Christians.

In book 3, meter 9, Boethius refers to God as "You who rule the world by perpetual reason." This is God as a Neoplatonist would understand him: a divine being working preexistent matter into a definite shape as part of a rational plan. On the Neoplatonist's account, creation consists of a hierarchy of being, with the One, or God, or the Good, at the very top. Instead of creation as it is given to us in the traditional Christian creation story, we are presented with creation as a series of emanations of being from the One, with each successive level of being striving to return to the source of its origins.

In the case of human beings, this involves a recognition of our divine origins. In living the life of reason as enjoined by Lady Philosophy, in overcoming our desires, sorrows, and pains, we are therefore becoming more God-like.

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