Literary point of view (Ex: Third person Limited) for the Kite RunnerCan anyone help me answer this because i don't understand what they mean by:    Literary point of view (Ex: Third Person...

Literary point of view (Ex: Third person Limited) for the Kite Runner

Can anyone help me answer this because i don't understand what they mean by:    Literary point of view (Ex: Third Person Limited)

It would great if anyone could help me with this i would really appreciate it

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lmetcalf's profile pic

lmetcalf | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Senior Educator

Posted on

Once you determine which point of view an author has chosen to use, you can think about what the advantages are for that choice.  The use of first person narration draws us into Amir's story.  We learn in the first chapter that he has something from his past that he has come to terms with, so we are drawn into this mystery that he is giving to us in pieces.  As he tells us stories from his childhood with Hassan we learn what his thoughts, feelings and motivations are from his point of view.  He reveals his strengths and his character flaws, which makes him very real and very human.  One might even say he not all that likebale!  But because he is telling the story, we want to know what makes this all change.  We experience his fear upon his return to Afganistan as an adult, his heartbreak as he sees Sohrab's body after the attempted suicide, and his pleasure at being able to share kite running with Sohrab once some time has passed in the United States.  By having the focus of the story on Amir's growth, we cheer him on each step in his journey.

sboeman's profile pic

sboeman | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Assistant Educator

Posted on

I don't see a question here, but perhaps I can provide some insight into what "literary point-of-view" means.  When a story is written with the narrator (or storyteller) as one of the characters in the story, then it's considered "first-person" narration.  Hosseini's novel The Kite Runner is one such book since Amir is actually in the story.  You see words like "I went to the movies and..." as clues to this type of narration.

"Third-person narration" is when the narrator is just an observer-he or she is NOT a character in the story.  The narrator reveals the characters and plot by saying "he" or "she".  This type of narration can be broken down further into "third-person limited" or "third-person omniscient".  "Limited" is when the narrator tells the story through the eyes of only one character-we know one character very well, but the narrator cannot "jump" to different scenes or times.  "Omniscient", however, literally means "all-knowing"-this narrator knows all and sees all and can jump from character to character.

Since I teach The Kite Runner, I have my students explore other possible narrative points-of-view, such as how would Assef tell the story of reuniting with Amir (in the first-person)?  How would a third-person observer describe the setting of the kite-flying competition?

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