List three animal metaphors used in Julius Caesar, act 1, scene 3.

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In act I, scene 3, Casca runs into Cicero on the streets of Rome and begins to tell him, in some excitement, about the many portents that have lately been seen. These include the following:

And yesterday the bird of night did sit
Even at noon-day upon the marketplace,
Hooting and shrieking

This "bird of night" is clearly an owl: it is nocturnal and hoots. Casca insists it is an omen or sign of unnatural happenings yet to come.

Cicero, the master of constructing an argument, listens and then says drily, in what is the most important speech in the scene,

Indeed, it is a strange-disposèd time.
But men may construe things after their fashion,
Clean from the purpose of the things themselves.

Cicero means that while the signs may be there, people may be interpreting them in self-serving ways that have nothing to do with what they really mean. In other words, as he well knows, we can twist circumstances to mean whatever we what them to mean. He is trying to advise Casca not to get so excited about these signs.

With typical irony, however, none of this sinks into Casca's consciousness. Cassius comes along, and Casca continues to speak of omens—in particular, a lion roaming in the capitol. He also compares the Roman people to sheep.

Therefore, three animal metaphors Shakespeare uses are the owl, whose strange daytime appearance is likened to the supernatural; the lion, a symbol of power which is compared to Caesar; and the Roman people, who are likened to the sheep, animals easily led and often slaughtered. But, as Cicero has pointed out, this might not be what these animals are pointing to at all: the comparisons (metaphors) might be all wrong.

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Animals are a recurring theme in Cassius's conversation with Casca in act 1, scene 3. He first gives general reference to animals behaving oddly as omens:

Why birds and beasts from quality and kind . . .
Why all these things change from their ordinance,
Their natures and preformed faculties,
To monstrous quality, why, you shall find
That heaven hath infused them with these spirits
To make them instruments of fear and warning
Unto some monstrous state.

Here, Cassius is making the case that there is something so unnatural in the state of the world (e.g., Caesar setting himself up as tyrant) that the animals have begun to act strangely. By making this case, he is implying that Caesar's abuses against the republic of Rome are so profound that nature itself has become distorted—a clear sign that the...

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