List the reasons why Nora decides to leave her husband and her children at the end of A Doll's House. Does this decision line up with who Nora presented herself as in the play? Was it a fair decision for her to make? Explain. Cite text evidence by act/line. 

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Nora decides to leave her husband and her children because she feels that she has been "done... a great wrong" by both her father and her husband, Torvald. She feels that she

passed from [her] father's hands into [Torvald's]. [Torvald] arranged everything according to [his] taste; and [she] got...

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Nora decides to leave her husband and her children because she feels that she has been "done... a great wrong" by both her father and her husband, Torvald. She feels that she

passed from [her] father's hands into [Torvald's]. [Torvald] arranged everything according to [his] taste; and [she] got the same tastes... or [she] pretended to. (Act 3)

She isn't sure which of these is the case (Act 3). She does not know whom she really is, what she likes or doesn't like, or what she thinks or doesn't think. She feels that she has lived her life "performing tricks" for men: first her father and then her husband.

Nora also realizes that she is not happy, that she's only been "merry," and she describes the house she shares with Torvald as "nothing but a play-room" in which she has been merely a "doll-wife," just as she was her father's "doll-child" before that. She also feels that her children have been like her "dolls" with whom she has played just as Torvald has played with her (act 3). This is how she now thinks of their marriage. She claims that she needs time now to "educate [her]self" and that she "must set about it alone." She declares that this need to educate herself is "why [she is] leaving" Torvald (Act 3). Nora must "stand quite alone," she feels, in order to come to know herself. She cannot be alone if she is a wife and mother, and so she has to leave.

Nora has always been rebellious—eating forbidden sweets and taking out illegal and secret loans—but she's always done it with the belief that she is loved and valued. When she learns that she is not loved and valued by Torvald as she has loved and valued him, she sees the fantasy that has been her life. The world, created and controlled by men, has not been fair to Nora, and now she rebels against it. We might be most likely to feel sorry for her children, but she makes the right decision for herself, putting herself first for the first time in her life.

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