List many reasons why a scatter graph shows that as the amount of after school activities increases the amount of total guilty cases for children between the ages of 12 to 17 increases and also how...

List many reasons why a scatter graph shows that as the amount of after school activities increases the amount of total guilty cases for children between the ages of 12 to 17 increases and also how school activities and guilty cases have decreased over the past 10 years for this same age group.

Asked on by danielb77

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steveschoen | College Teacher | (Level 1) Associate Educator

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There can be many reasons.  With more activities, there are going to be more children participating and, thus, more guilty cases.  Even if the number of children were to stay the same, with more activities, they have more opportunities to be found guilty in cases.  It could be because, with more activities, it increases the area the officials overseeing, which means there is more temptation of children doing things that would be found guilty.  Or, with more activities, that sponsoring organization would look to further increase the officials even more, which means they would be finding even more guilty cases in the activities.

In turn, all of these can be turned around for decreasing activities and guilty cases.  As in, with fewer activities, there would be fewer opportunities for children to be found guilty.  With fewer activities, there would be less of a need for officials to oversee programs.  And, thus, fewer guilty cases are found.  And, so on.

The important thing to realize is, a scatter graph can show a correlation between two aspects like the number of activities and the number of guilty cases.  But, it never tells why.  The "why" needs to be examined further.  The "why" probably isn't in the numbers but more likely in the fact that many regular people were out.  Or, there was a special activity going on, etc.. aka something outside the norm.

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