List all the steps that the Egyptians take to mummify Elizabeth's deceased pet.

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The answer to this question can be found in the chapter titled "Ceremony for the Dead." Once it is decided that the pet will be mummified, Toby informs the other children that it is a long process. It will take about 5 or 6 days. He then tells them what...

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The answer to this question can be found in the chapter titled "Ceremony for the Dead." Once it is decided that the pet will be mummified, Toby informs the other children that it is a long process. It will take about 5 or 6 days. He then tells them what supplies are needed. Palm branches and flower petals are needed for the procession. After the procession ended, the kids discussed what supplies would be needed for the actual mummification process. Oil is needed, and the kids figured bicycle oil was as good as any. The first step was to prepare a saltwater bath. The pet was then left to soak until "the following afternoon." The kids were a bit shocked at how gross the bird looked when removed.

The appearance of the mummy-to-be when he was removed from his brine bath, on the following afternoon, was something of a shock to everybody.

Then fresh water was poured over the animal to remove the brine. Next, the dead pet was dried.

When Pete-ho-tep was dry and his feathers rearranged, he did look almost as good as new, and the mummification process continued.

Following that was anointing with spices and perfume and then wrapping it in thin strips of oil-soaked cloth. The bird was then laid to rest with a supply of birdseed and toys in a small pyramid that the kids made of old bricks.

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In the story, the children (calling themselves the Egyptians) take several steps to mummify Petey, Elizabeth's dead parakeet. Toby (Ramose) had originally intended to remove Petey's internal organs but eventually decided against it when Elizabeth objected.

The Egyptians first soak Petey in salt water.

The following afternoon, Toby pours some fresh water over the dead bird and then dries him off with the tail end of his T-shirt. There is every indication that he also rearranges Petey's feathers so that the dead bird looks presentable for his funeral.

In the next few days, Petey is anointed with different spices and perfumes. Then, he is carefully wrapped in thin strips of oil-soaked cloth. Petey is finally laid to rest in a pyramid built out of old bricks. The children place a few of Petey's favorite toys and a supply of birdseed inside the pyramid with him.

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