List 10 level two questions and 1 level three question over chapters 16-18 of To Kill a Mockingbird.

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litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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Level Two questions are based on higher order thinking.  These do not have one right answer, but instead are based on inferential thinking.  You look at the facts, and then make an inference based on those facts.  You have to go beyond the surface for this kind of thinking.

Level Two Questions

Why does Jem have an appetite when no one else does? (Ch. 16)

Everybody's appetite was delicate this morning, except Jem's: he ate his way through three eggs. Atticus watched in frank admiration; Aunt Alexandra sipped coffee and radiated waves of disapproval. (Ch. 16)

Why does Atticus say that Mr. Cunningham is a good man, even though he was one of the mob?  Why does Atticus defend him? (Ch. 16)

What does it say about the mob that it took an 8 year old child to bring them to their senses?  What does it say about human nature?  (Ch. 16)

What does it tell you about Miss Maudie that she is the only one who doesn’t go to court?  (Ch. 16)

What does Dolphus Raymond’s choice to pretend to be drunk, and the reason why, say about society? (Ch. 16)

She couldn't live like Mr. Dolphus Raymond, who preferred the company of Negroes, because she didn't own a riverbank and she wasn't from a fine old family. (Ch. 16)

Atticus focuses on whether or not anyone called a doctor when cross-examining Tate.  What does this choice tell you about him? (Ch. 17)

What is your opinion of Atticus as a lawyer? (Ch. 17)

Why do you think Lee chose to describe the Ewell house and yard in such detail during the trial?  How do you feel about the Ewells? (Ch. 17)

How does Mayella’s testimony shape your opinion of her? (Ch. 18)

Level Three Questions

Level 3 questions require application.  These are higher level thinking questions, which require the use of imagination and ingenuity.

Pretend you are Mayella.  How would you have felt if you were testifying while Atticus was cross-examining you?  Use your understanding of her background and situation to answer.

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