A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning by John Donne

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What is a summary for lines 9-10 of John Donne's poem, "A Valediction Forbidding Mourning"?

What is a summary for lines 9-10 of John Donne's poem, "A Valediction Forbidding Mourning"?

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amy-lepore eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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In the first two stanzas, Donne tells his wife that they should part quietly as virtuous men die (because they're not afraid of where they'll go next or their future)--no crying should cheapen their love and marriage.  He tells her their love is strong and gives support throughout the rest of the poem. 

Moving of th' earth brings harms and fears,
Men reckon what it did, and meant;
But trepidation of the spheres,
Though greater far, is innocent.

In stanza three, Donne offers the support of superstitions popular during the day.  Earthquakes and other natural disasters cause much distress since we can see and hear them.  People try to assign a meaning to them--it's an omen for this, or a harbinger to some other great event yet to happen.  However, this sort of stuff goes on all the time on other planets and elsewhere in the universe.  No one sees or hears or feels these...

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