Lindner refers to the topic of his discussion with the Youngers as one of Clybourne Park's "special community problems." Why is this ironic?I think it's ironic because at this point, this is when...

Lindner refers to the topic of his discussion with the Youngers as one of Clybourne Park's "special community problems." Why is this ironic?

I think it's ironic because at this point, this is when Lindner came over for the first time (on moving day), and technically, they aren't even part of the community.  And communities are supposed to try and work and solve its problems out, not avoid them by trying to buy their problems away. Is this right?? And if you have any more suggestions...PLEASE, I would love to hear them! Thanks so much!! 

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Ashley Kannan | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

I think that Hansberry develops Lindner's role in the manner she does to highlight the complexity of the problem that people of color face in trying to integrate into largely White areas.  She is mindful that the simple designation of "integration" is actually a complex reality that is filled with how different people view their interests in different lights.  Lindner is one such example.  On one hand, he presents himself as a totally reasonable man.  There is little in the manner of his presentation that makes one believe that he is a man of violence or of irrational hatred.  However, it becomes evident that he favors the Status Quo and does not want to see it change.  He is a proponent of how reality is constructed as it benefits he and his kind, at the cost of Walter and his.  In the end, his reference to "special community problems" and his desire to want to buy out Walter is a representation of the lengths that he will go to ensure that what is present is maintained at all costs.  His definition of community is one that excludes people of color.  It is ironic that he speaks of "special community problems" for he is one of them, in the manner in which he wishes to continue the racial prejudice and discrimination that denies the very essence of community.  Hansberry does this to show the level of inertia and difficulty that the Youngers must endure in order to discover and obtain their dream.

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