Lincoln's lines at the conclusion of the Gettysburg Address was "government of the people, by the people, and for the people, shall not perish from the earth." Does this refer to a democratic form of government? 

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The final passage in Lincoln's Gettysburg Address is indeed an homage to the style of government in the United States. The United States is a republic or a representative democracy. The very word democracy means "people rule" in Ancient Greek. Lincoln refers to a government of the people, by the...

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The final passage in Lincoln's Gettysburg Address is indeed an homage to the style of government in the United States. The United States is a republic or a representative democracy. The very word democracy means "people rule" in Ancient Greek. Lincoln refers to a government of the people, by the people, and for the people to frame the importance of those that lost their lives to protect this democracy.

Democratic governments are established with the belief that the citizens should have the right to govern themselves. It is a system that allows the greatest amount of liberty for its people. The principles of democracy were outlined in the United States Constitution and the Bill of Rights. A system of government was developed that enabled the people to decide the direction of the nation. Lincoln found it important to end his speech with in a way that honored that system of government.

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