lightning electricityI am very sorry that my question was not clear. Actually, what I meant was that can lightning be used to produce electricity? I was thinking that in places like Kampala and...

lightning electricityI am very sorry that my question was not clear. Actually, what I meant was that can lightning be used to produce electricity? I was thinking that in places like Kampala and Tororo in Uganda, Bogor on Java, Indonesia and Singapore ,lightning can be used to harness electricity. Towers can be used with a semiconductor so that only a small amount can be taken in and used. These places receive sufficient amount of lightning. Is my idea practical? Please answer.

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bandmanjoe's profile pic

bandmanjoe | Middle School Teacher | (Level 2) Senior Educator

Posted on

I think most anything is possible, if we expand our thinking on the subject.  The thing that limits us is our own thinking, sometimes.  The annals of history are full of scientists trying to "catch" a bolt of lightning, to examine it, to try to harness it, to put it to use for mankind.  Although current technology does not exist, that does not mean it could not be explored and developed for the future.

grush249's profile pic

grush249 | Student, Grade 10 | (Level 1) Honors

Posted on

As much thought you've given on the topic, and your will to help the world is admirable. But lightening can't be used for harnessing electricity because:

1. Thunder or lightening is irregular or not in a fixed pattern. It's not a reliable or a stable source.

2. The electricity received by such is one shot- it will not produce enough electricity (and that is the best case perfect world scenario).

3. The machinery involved cannot work fast enough to keep up with the storm.

4. The alternative sources of electricity work on the principle of converting mechanical energy into electric energy. Electricity cannot produce any mechanical effect.

5. Lightening only produces current, whereas we also require voltage for working electricity.

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